Bellerophontes

 

hellenismo:

Ἕκτη Μεσοῦντος/ Ἕκτη ἐπὶ δέκα/Ἑκκαιδεκάτη, XVI day From today’s sunset: sixteenth day of Hekatombaion. Festival of Synoikia “After the death of Aegeus, Theseus conceived a wonderful design, and settled all the residents of Attica in one city, thus making one people of one city out of those who up to that time had been scattered about and were not easily called together for the common interests of all, nay, they sometimes actually quarrelled and fought with each other…Accordingly, after doing away with the townhalls and council-chambers and magistracies in the several communities, and after building a common town-hall and council-chamber for all on the ground where the upper town of the present day stands, he named the city Athens, and instituted a Panathenaic festival. He instituted also the Metoikia (Synoikia), or Festival of Settlement, on the sixteenth day of the month Hekatombaion, and this is still celebrated.” (Plutarch. Theseus 24.1-4) “Under Cecrops and the first Kings, down to the reign of Theseus, Attica had always consisted of a number of independent townships, each with its own town hall and magistrates. Except in times of danger the king at Athens was not consulted; in ordinary seasons they carried on their government and settled their affairs without his interference; sometimes even they waged war against him, as in the case of the Eleusinians with Eumolpus against Erechtheus. In Theseus, however, they had a king of equal intelligence and power; and one of the chief features in his organization of the country was to abolish the council-chambers and magistrates of the petty cities, and to merge them in the single council-chamber and town hall of the present capital. Individuals might still enjoy their private property just as before, but they were henceforth compelled to have only one political centre, viz., Athens; which thus counted all the inhabitants of Attica among her citizens, so that when Theseus died he left a great state behind him. Indeed, from him dates the Synoikia, or Feast of Union; which is paid for by the state, and which the Athenians still keep in honour of the Goddess Athena.” (Thuc. II, 15) Sacrifices to Athena and Eirene (Isocr. XV 109; IG II2 1496; schol Ar. Peace 962; IG I3 244 C)

hellenismo:

Ἕκτη Μεσοῦντος/ Ἕκτη ἐπὶ δέκα/Ἑκκαιδεκάτη, XVI day
From today’s sunset: sixteenth day of Hekatombaion.

Festival of Synoikia
“After the death of Aegeus, Theseus conceived a wonderful design, and settled all the residents of Attica in one city, thus making one people of one city out of those who up to that time had been scattered about and were not easily called together for the common interests of all, nay, they sometimes actually quarrelled and fought with each other…Accordingly, after doing away with the townhalls and council-chambers and magistracies in the several communities, and after building a common town-hall and council-chamber for all on the ground where the upper town of the present day stands, he named the city Athens, and instituted a Panathenaic festival. He instituted also the Metoikia (Synoikia), or Festival of Settlement, on the sixteenth day of the month Hekatombaion, and this is still celebrated.” (Plutarch. Theseus 24.1-4)

“Under Cecrops and the first Kings, down to the reign of Theseus, Attica had always consisted of a number of independent townships, each with its own town hall and magistrates. Except in times of danger the king at Athens was not consulted; in ordinary seasons they carried on their government and settled their affairs without his interference; sometimes even they waged war against him, as in the case of the Eleusinians with Eumolpus against Erechtheus. In Theseus, however, they had a king of equal intelligence and power; and one of the chief features in his organization of the country was to abolish the council-chambers and magistrates of the petty cities, and to merge them in the single council-chamber and town hall of the present capital. Individuals might still enjoy their private property just as before, but they were henceforth compelled to have only one political centre, viz., Athens; which thus counted all the inhabitants of Attica among her citizens, so that when Theseus died he left a great state behind him. Indeed, from him dates the Synoikia, or Feast of Union; which is paid for by the state, and which the Athenians still keep in honour of the Goddess Athena.” (Thuc. II, 15)

Sacrifices to Athena and Eirene (Isocr. XV 109; IG II2 1496; schol Ar. Peace 962; IG I3 244 C)